Rick's Free Auto Repair Advice

Best battery for your car

Who makes the best battery for your car?

So your battery’s dead and now you’re shopping for the best battery for your car. . Here’s the skinny on battery manufacturers. There are really only three manufacturers—Johnson Controls, East Penn, and Exide. All the retailers like Autozone, Advance Auto Parts, O’Reily, Sears, Walmart, Costco, and Sams get their batteries from those three manufacturers. Each retailer orders batteries custom built to their specifications and label them with different store brands, so it’s hard to compare from one store to another. Worse yet, each retailer orders batteries from several manufacturers based on the factory’s proximity to the store and their price on each battery at the time they order. Batteries are heavy, so it doesn’t make a lot of sense to ship them across country when you can get them from the nearest factory.

Even within a single brand, you may discover that one group size is made by one company and other sizes are made by one of the other two. So relying on brand alone isn’t a good buying strategy.

Everyone asks me, “What’s the best car battery?” So you can see that there’s really no single answer to that question. But I can give you some battery buying tips.

Tip #1 Buy the right battery for your vehicle

A lead acid battery relies on a chemical reaction to produce power. If you took high school physics, you already know that chemical reactions slow down as the temperature drops. So a battery can’t produce as much power at -20° than at 98°. Yet, an engine needs more power to start when it’s cold. That’s because oil thickens in cold weather and creates more friction for all the moving parts. To give you a better idea of a battery’s power when cold, battery manufacturers rate their batteries in Cold Cranking Amps (CCA). A battery’s CCA is based on testing at 0°F to see how many amps it can deliver for 30-secs without dropping below 7.2 volts. Don’t confuse the battery’s CCA rating with its cranking amp (CA) rating. CA is based on the same test, but it’s conducted at 32°F.

The first step is getting a replacement battery is to determine the “group size” for your car. Batteries are grouped according to their length, width and height as well as the location of their positive and negative posts. Find the group size and dimensions here. If you buy the wrong group size, the battery cables in your car may not reach the right terminals.

Next, match the battery’s CCA rating to the car maker’s recommendation. You can buy a battery with a higher CCA rating that’s the same group size to fit your car, but you shouldn’t. Here’s why:

This advice comes right from a leading battery expert at Johnson controls: Buy a battery with the same CCA rating that came with the car. To get more CCA’s out of the same size battery, the manufacturer can either use thinner plates and more of them or thicker plates with less battery acid. Thinner plates can warp when charged at a high rate after a deep discharge and thicker plates with less acid can also cause problems after a deep discharge. Bottom line: installing a battery with a higher CCA rating can actually REDUCE its life in your vehicle, especially in newer vehicles equipped with sophisticated power management systems that operate the charging system on software based on the factory CCA rating. Stick with the car maker’s recommendations—don’t second guess the engineers.

Tip #2 Buy the battery with the longest warranty

Batteries in late model vehicle rarely last beyond five years. So chances are good that you’ll be replacing the battery before the car dies. When you buy an 84- month battery, you’re getting more than just a longer warranty, you’re buying insurance too. When it fails, you’ll have a larger “pro-rated” credit to apply towards the purchase of your next battery.

Since the three major car battery manufacturers make all the batteries for all the auto parts retailers, independent shops, wholesale clubs, and big box stores, the battery’s brand name is irrelevant. It’s all about the warranty.

In years past, a battery would often carry a three-year over-the-counter free replacement warranty with an additional two years of pro-rated warranty. Those days are gone. Now, the best batteries carry a three-year warranty—period. Economy batteries have a one or two year warranty. Battery manufacturers have shortened their warranties because of the excessive under-hood heat in late model cars. Car makers pack so much equipment under the hood that car batteries now have to operate in a much hotter environment than older vehicles. As a result, they don’t last as long.

Tip #3 Buy from a store or shop that can provide the best service when you need help

Good luck getting your battery replaced under warranty if you buy from a big box store. They clerks in those stores are barely qualified to stock shelves, let alone conduct a proper battery test. Plus, the competency level of their service techs is, well, disappointing would be an understatement. It’s my opinion that it’s well worth the extra few bucks to buy a battery from a store or shop that has competent technicians who can professionally test, install and replace your battery.

Tip #4 Keep your receipt

If you ever need warranty service you’ll have to find the purchase date. Some stores keep that information, but most don’t. Since most stores print their receipts on thermal paper that fades over time, make a photocopy of the receipt using a copy machine. Then store the receipt in the glove box. That way you’ll have a readable receipt when you need it.

©, 2016 Rick Muscoplat

 

Posted on by Rick Muscoplat


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