Rick's Free Auto Repair Advice

Power steering hard to turn

Power steering hard to turn on Buick, Chevrolet, GMC and Saturn

If you have a Power steering hard to turn condition on the vehicles listed below, you should be aware of several service bulletins and a special coverage adjustment from GM to fix the problem.

Cause of Power steering hard to turn

GM has determined that the power steering pumps on the vehicles listed below can develop a pump wear conditions that result in an intermittent drop of power steering fluid pressure that makes power steering hard to turn. You haven’t lost your power steering during these periods, you’ve just lost power assist. Loss of power assist makes it very hard to turn the vehicle, especially at low speeds. The problem has been traced to a faulty power steering pump.

The conditions when power steering hard to turn occurs

The condition appears most often in slow-speed maneuvers or at low engine RPM. It usually occurs when engine RPMs are between 1800 and 2000.

Vehicles affected by 14329B – SPECIAL COVERAGE ADJUSTMENT – LOSS OF POWER STEERING ASSIST

2008-11 Buick Enclave
2009-11 Chevrolet Traverse
2007-11 GMC Acadia
2007-10 Saturn Outlook

14329B – SPECIAL COVERAGE ADJUSTMENT – LOSS OF POWER STEERING ASSIST

GM issues a 14329B – SPECIAL COVERAGE ADJUSTMENT – LOSS OF POWER STEERING ASSIST campaign on Sep 23, 2015 to address the problem for the vehicles below. For a period of 10-years or 150,000 miles, GM dealers will flush the power steering system, replace the pump and install a new steering gear valve housing. These repairs will be at no charge.

Cautions when completing this repair

GM notes that a completer power steering fluid flush is required and it’s critical that no old fluid comes into contact with the new seals in the steering gear housing kit.

20954812 Pump, Power Steering
22847734 Kit, Steering Gear Hsg (w/RPO NV7) 1
22847735 Kit, Steering Gear Hsg. (w/o RPO NV7) 1

GM steering gear valve assembly

GM steering gear valve assembly

If you do the repair yourself. You must disconnect the intermediate steering shaft, power steering hoses and lower the gear to gain access to the steering gear valve assembly.

Once you do that, perform these steps:

Remove the power steering gear inlet and outlet pipe clip bolt (2).

Separate the power steering gear inlet and outlet hoses from the power steering gear inlet and outlet pipe clip.

Disconnect the electrical connector from the steering gear valve solenoid, if equipped with Variable Effort Steering (RPO NV7).

Clean the area around the steering gear housing to prevent any debris from entering the gear once the housing is removed.

Remove the steering gear housing bolts and housing (1) from the steering gear Transfer the steering gear valve solenoid to the new housing, if equipped with Variable Effort Steering (RPO NV7).

Remove the steering gear solenoid valve bolts and valve.

Remove and discard the three O-ring seals.

Install the new O-ring seals provided in the kit.

Install the steering gear valve and secure with bolts.

Tighten the steering gear solenoid valve bolts to 8 N.m (71 lb in).

Install the blue seal protector (1) provided in kit onto the steering gear pinion shaft to prevent damage to the seal when installing the housing.

Install the new steering gear housing and bolts to the steering gear. Remove the seal protector.

Tighten the housing bolts to 21 N.m (16 lb ft).

Connect the electrical connector to the steering gear valve solenoid, if equipped with Variable Effort Steering (RPO NV7).

Install the power steering gear inlet and outlet hoses to the steering gear.

Install the power steering gear inlet hose retaining plate bolt (1).

Posted on by Rick Muscoplat



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